Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth

$1.50

Description

Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth by Lester C King is a Growing Earth theory book from 1983. This is an now old Expanding Earth theory book without much information or book reviews of it.

Lester Charles King was a fairly famous and respected South African geologist who was interested in the geomorphology and also the Growing Earth theory, seafloor spreading and other geological process that may have involved a smaller Earth model.

William Carnell Erickson on Lester C King's ideas and book review of Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth

There was, however, one continental-drifter and expansionist who never accepted Vine-Matthews or, for that matter,seafloor spreading (in the generally accepted sense of a convection-driven bilateral “conveyor belt”). Lester C King, the great South African geologist and geomorphologist, was among the earliest critics of Vine-Matthews and seafloor spreading.
Not only did he dispute the emerging plate tectonic dogma, but he also insisted that continental displacement (i.e., expansion) unfolded through a series of discrete tectonic episodes that were largely restricted to the Mesozoic, as opposed to a gradual and continuous process from the Triassic onward, as the V-M-based plate tectonic and expansion theories would have it. (Erickson, 1988)

In his 1983 book Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea Floors on an Expanding Earth (a book rarely cited in the literature, alas), King challenged the underlying assumptions of the V-M hypothesis
and seafloor spreading in general.

Quote from William Carnell Erickson's free PDF on this particular bit of the Expanding Earth theory.

Royal Society of South Africa on Lester C King's Expanding Earth book

Unlike Du Toit, who died in 1948, King was able to capitalise on the later upsurge of respectability of, and accumulating data about, both plate tectonics and expansion in the 1960s and 1970s and his book with its explanatory title Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea Floors on an Expanding Earth (1983) was extremely successful.

Geological Journal book review of Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth

Lester King’s book presents an unorthodox view of our planet. It is an inconsistent and sometimes confusing account to which it is difficult for a reviewer to do justice. Nowhere is there a clear statement of the author’s beliefs or the reason behind the book.

Briefly, King presents a theory of cymatogens and the idea that post-Mesozoic drift is largely due to expansion of the earth, not conventional sea floor spreading. Cymatogens are major ridges on the earth’s surface where movement is primarilykrtical and driven by unknown forces. All rift systems and many mountain chains are interpreted as cymatogens. Cymatogeny has dominated in the late Cemoic and Quaternary.

Full Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth book review in Geological Journal (PDF).

A Hallam's Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth book review

King's is a rather discursive, rambling and anecdote-ridden effort, in which a wide range of geological and geomorpholigical phenomena is discussed. It is full of categoric assertions of heterodox ideas either unsupported or feebly supported by evidence.

... It is difficult to piin him down either to a logically developed argument in favour of his ideas and against the alternatives, or anything so mundane as a systematic presentation and discussion of key supporting facts. The material is organized in a confusing was as he jumps from one subject to another, and consists largely of ill-digested information culled from a variety of sources, only some of which are cited.

Indeed, his list of references seems curiously arbitrary, omitting mention, for instance, of Owen's work, which might have been thought to be supportive, and disregarding much that is critical. The overall impression left with the reader is of an imaginative but undisciplined thinker who is largely out of touch with current research in the Earth sciences. King's book cannot be accepted as a serious contribution to science and is unlikely to produce any converts to an expanding Earth model.

Quote from The unlikelihood of an expanding Earth (free PDF).

Journal of Coastal Research review of Lester C King's book

Written by a distinguished geomorphologist, this is an excellent introduction to plate tectonics and sea floor spreading. His earth expansion hypothesis is controversial but only a secondary question. Of particular value is his dynamic-historic explanation of coast types, coastal plains and continental shelves.

Quote from Rhodes W Fairbridge, Columbia University, New York City, USA (Journal of Coastal Research, Vol 3, No.4, 1987)

Biographies of Lester King

Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea-floors on an Expanding Earth Lester C King book review geology geologist

Lester King was one of the most influential geomorphologists of the twentieth century ... King challenged the Davisian scheme of landscape evolution and offered an alternative model that has proved viable in many parts of the world. Whether pedimentation and scarp retreat are necessarily related is however questionable. King devised original explanations for several well known landforms, and though many of his ideas and interpretations have fallen by the wayside he stimulated many of his contemporaries critically to review their assumptions and explanations.

From King of the plains: Lester King's contributions to geomorphology

Among our country’s eminent early geomorphologists (and one of the most influential of the 20th century) was Lester Charles King whose contribution has been enormous. Perhaps unusually, he was attracted by topics both immense – continental drift, the morphology of the earth – and small – the Natal monocline, the Cango and Makapan Caves. Moreover, by all accounts, he was an excellent and interesting lecturer who stimulated students to enter the field, and he was certainly a fluent and productive writer who produced a wealth of publications many of which were translated.

King’s imagination, like that of others, was captured by the emerging ideas around continental drift and plate tectonics that had first been given currency by Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) and that had been taken further by Du Toit who proved it geologically. King lectured on continental drift at a number of universities in the USA during a tour in 1958 and he also advocated the theory of an expanding earth, an idea then still radical. Unlike Du Toit, who died in 1948, King was able to capitalise on the later upsurge of respectability of, and accumulating data about, both plate tectonics and expansion in the 1960s and 1970s and his book with its explanatory title Wandering Continents and Spreading Sea Floors on an Expanding Earth (1983) was extremely successful.

From Lester Charles King (1907-1989) and South African Geomorphology (Royal Society of South Africa)

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